As I plan to delve further into this idea of “Social Teams”

6 Secrets to Corporate Authenticity

25 08 2010 [tweetmeme]“Authentic” is undoubtedly one of most echoed words in the Social World nowadays – applied especially liberally when explaining to companies the means by which they should be conveying themselves to the broader world in order to be heard.
The term seems seldom explained more than that, and yet the implications are deep.  It amuses me to no end that the word “authentic” has staged such an emergent come back into our vocabulary – not least of which when used to describe a media and communication form so recently embraced for its ability to allow people to engage in an almost schizophrenic array of multiple online personalities.
Ironic then, that in the current online world that we’ve created, where it’s so easy to be anyone or anything you can imagine, it’s never been so important to simply be yourself.
That in a world of Avatars, Second Lives, and Virtual Worlds – we want to know that we’re communicating with real people who are being their real selves.
Maybe it’s a sign that the Social World is growing up – moving from a prior youthfulness happy to live in a world sporting fake Rolexes and toting counterfeit Louis Vuitton bags; to a decidedly a more mature mode preferring to spend their newfound wealth buying the real thing on 5th Avenue.
The formula for being “authentic” as an individual must surely be simple then: Be yourself, communicate from the heart and be consistent.
But how do you achieve that in an enterprise setting.
How does a company made up of thousands of voices come across with the same effectiveness as one.
Here are some guidelines for your internal “social champions” to follow: 1) and 2) “Know Who You Are and Live It” – Earlier this year I had the good fortune to go to the Front End of Innovation Conference in Boston where Bert Jacobs, one of the founders of “Life is Good” was speaking.
In his speech, he relayed the story of how the two brothers started their fledgling business on a street corner selling t-shirts and how they were able to translate that into the marketing empire that Life is Good is now.
During his session there was a comment – one that he repeated during his speech, and then signed along with his name on the Frisbee he flung into the audience and pinged me squarely on the forehead with (there was a ricochet involved from a nearby audience member – honest!).
The comment was “know who you are, and live it”.
Now Bert’s no social media guru, nor is he making money from his insight (I believe he donates a lot of his speaking fees to charity – He’s a quiet, down to earth, and confident guy who’s simply figured out the secret to his success.
That secret has helped him translate a feeling, an emotion, and a mission from his heart to his products – and onwards to his customers.
This effect though is multiplied in the social world and the necessity to “know who you are” with ultimate certainty and to consistently live out those values in the social worlds is the real key to success for corporations in what has to be one of the ultimate brand challenges of the modern business world.
Why the “ultimate” brand challenge.

Because the Social World has an incredible memory – infinite actually

What you say, what you do, how you do it, and who you do it with is preserved along with people’s opinions of your actions from the moment it happens, until the end of time.
Like an elephant on steroids, your image in the social world is established by your actions, and remembered forever.
If “Knowing Who You Are” is number 1) on the list of things companies must do – then “Live It” has to be number 2).  Consistency is a key element of authenticity  – people want to know that you not only “talk the talk”, but also “walk the walk”.  One communication effort can set an intention, but it takes consistency to set an image.
A positive Social Image is a fragile entity and is re-enforced or recast depending on your actions, engendering strong levels of customer loyalty and advocacy to those who get it right – and equally strong negative reactions to those who trip up on the path.
Never mind women, hell hath no fury like a customer scorned in the social world – where one negative voice can sound like hundreds online.
The need for consistency in your actions is then further exaggerated in the current Google-centric world where information is omnipresent and easy to access.
In this world, it’s not just your actions that matter, but those of everyone you associate with too.  Nestlé’s well publicized controversy regarding the source of Palm Oil  used in some of their confectionary is just one example of this in action.

3) Be Real – The Social World is made up of individuals – not corporations

Talk to them in the same formal way you approach your PR campaigns and you’ll find the same level of interest and disengagement you probably got from journalists when you sent them that Press Release announcing your new six sigma process (yaaawwwwnn).
Interactions with actual people and personalities are simply more “sticky” than formal corporate approaches.
Whilst it’s important to institute guidelines and rules for those interactions, you should, whenever possible,  make sure that your company’s interactions come across as being made on a person-to-person basis and not on a corporate entity-to-whomever-will-listen basis.
4) Be Transparent – Part of the potential poisoned chalice that can be connecting to thousands of people is that you’ll find it very hard to hide information – so don’t bother doing so.
Treat your social world as if they’re an integral part of your company.
Let them know early when good news is underway, and apologize early when you screw up.  Open up to your community and they’ll reward you with understanding, forgiveness, and loyalty.
5) Cultivate Relationships, not Transactions – Treat the communities you interact with as if they were integral partners in your company’s success and not just simply a transaction source. Care about them, ensure they get value out of the relationship then have with you, and make sure the flow of information and value goes both ways.
6) Do it yourself – This last one is the simplest – you want to be yourself.
You want to be “real”.
You want to cultivate lasting relationships with your social community.
Then do it yourself – don’t hire external partners to do it for you.
Partners have their role in all this – as teachers, thought leaders, and general resources – but you shouldn’t rely on them for execution – that’s just lazy, and in an age of transparency, it won’t take long for the social world to see through you.
Invest in the internal capabilities and expertise to drive and deliver value to and from your communities and the returns will be hundred-fold.
Got more tips on how to be Authentic.
Share them below.

Comments : 4 Comments » Tags: authentic

authenticity, avatars, bert jacobs, brand, brand challenge, brand management, communication, community, conference, consultants, corporate, corporate brand, enterprise, front end of innovation, guru, life is good, nestle, online communities, online teams, online world, person-to-person, personal brand, relationships, second life, social business, social champion, social image, , social world, teachers, thought leaders, transparency, transparent, virtual world Categories : , The 4 Laws of Enduring Innovation Success.
7 04 2010 [tweetmeme]Always an avid reader of the Financial Times, (one of the few decent news sources in an otherwise barren information landscape here in the US)  I came across a great commentary/review by the FT’s always fabulous Lucy Kellaway on the “Money-Honey’s” (CNBC’s Maria Bartiromo) recent book “The Ten Laws of Enduring Success”.
Lucy does amusingly short work of debunking the 10 laws that Maria came up with, and proposes a few laws of her own instead.
Lucy’s Laws were so much better formulated (in my opinion) that it got me thinking about the “Laws” of successful Innovation programs – not least of which because I think the first couple would be the same as the ones Lucy came up with.
So, here are my 4 Laws of Enduring Innovation Success: 1) Be Lucky – no matter how many different ways you squeeze it, Innovation is about luck.
With your typical long term program “failing” 75% of the time, there can be no doubt that it takes a certain amount of luck to be successful – especially over the longer term.
You are in essence, shooting into the dark with most innovation programs – trying products and processes that haven’t been tried before in your company, your industry, or sometimes even the world.
That’s not to say you can’t improve your chances of getting lucky though.
Unlike with the Las Vegas casinos, no one will kick you out of the game for learning the innovation equivalent of card counting techniques.
Indeed, in this game, cheating of any form is encouraged; and banding together in casino-busting style innovation teams with other individuals and companies is heavily rewarded.
By setting up and executing robust innovation strategies and processes you are in essence increasing the predictability of the Lucky Breaks you get – And in Innovation, Luckier is most definitely Better.
2)  Be Ambitious – There’s an old saying: “Fortune Favors the Brave” – and nowhere else is that truer than in the Innovation game.
To score big, you have to aim big.  If you only look for incremental ideas, then that’s all you’ll get.
During my time at Imaginatik, we used to make the bold claim of being able to consistently achieve “a 10x ROI on your investment”.  How did we make sure that happened.
By making sure that the problems being targeted by the client’s innovation strategy were big enough to achieve at least that.
And you know what.
It worked.
3)  Stay Focused – Running an Innovation program at a big company is kind of like a subscription to a “Shiny-New-Toy-Of-The-Month” Club.  It’s easy to get distracted by the current toy sent to you.
It’s easy to forget to go to the mailbox for the following month’s toy because you’re having too much fun with this month’s toy still.
And after a while, it’s easy to forget the reason you shelled out so much money to get the subscription in the first place.
To that end, maintaining a laser-like focus on what you’re trying to achieve is imperative for an innovation program.  Your Innovation strategy needs to be revisited constantly and attacked with the same brutality for embracing change as you’re demanding from the organization with the innovations that you are introducing.  Your strategy needs to be a fluid structure with one constant– “How can I best drive significant business results and organic growth for my organization?” – and you should make sure that your processes and actions are targeted at achieving that goal.
4)  Embrace Everyone – not in a “creepy guy who keeps looking at me funny” way – but rather in a “let’s talk to, and get input from, as many different people as possible” in your quest to solve your corporations problems.
Innovation, more so than any other business discipline is leading the way in the upcoming socialized business revolution.
That revolution will herald a new era where a company’s potential knowledge-base of solutions is no longer limited to the company walls, nor even close collaborators, but will instead embrace a global audience of potential participants.
To do this, you’ll need to begin to develop new skill sets that will involve learning how to identify which communities of people provide you with specific types of input; learning to set up and drive Social Teams to turn subsets of those communities into useable and active groups that will help you achieve your goals; and learning how to make those groups self sustainable so as to make sure they’re constantly available to you as a resource.
That’s it – 4 simple laws for ensuring that you not only become successful, but also stay successful.
Keep these 4 on a post-it on your desk, on a poster on your wall, or as the screensaver on your laptop – whatever works for you – just do them.

Do you have any other Laws to Enduring Innovation Success?[tweetmeme]

Comments : 8 Comments » Tags: corporate

ideation, imaginatik, innovation, innovation strategy, leadership, online communities, online teams, Open Innovation, practitioner, social teams, strategy Categories : Defining the “Social Team”.
9 02 2010 [tweetmeme]If you’ve been following me online on Twitter or elsewhere, you’ve probably heard me mention the concept of “Social Teams” more than a few times recently.
It is, in my mind, a powerful idea that has the ability to change the way companies and individuals view online collaboration efforts – with the potential to achieve dramatic results.
I’ve always believed that people want to interact online in a similar structure to their interactions in the offline world.
The fact that we’re not usually able to doesn’t mean that we don’t want to.
In the real world, we associate ourselves with communities to find people of similar interests with whom to interact.
These communities are important to define the overall population of socially connected people; but they’re useless as a way to actually get anything done.  When we set out to actually achieve something, we abandon the broader “community” concept in favor of focused subgroups of active individuals that are more motivated and able to get things done.
For example, in my sport of choice, rugby, we talk about a wider “rugby community” around the world.
When we go out, we socialize, drink, and have fun as a community – it’s a bond that ties rugby players around the world.
But we don’t compete as a community, we compete as individual teams.
We don’t govern the sport as a community, but rather using an elected “team” of individuals picked from the community.
In other words we “exist” as a community, but we “achieve” as a team.
The same concept is true in the online world.
Technology has given us the methods by which to define and connect to, our own communities.  Each of us “exists” within a multitude of communities with which we  associate – with differing levels of interest.
However, to actually achieve a specific aim/goal, we need to tap into a subset of that group to create a “team” to help us achieve that.
It’s important to understand that whilst I use the term “team”, these sub-groups of people don’t exactly conform to the standard idea of what a “team” looks like or acts like – we’re no longer looking at working groups of enlisted employees in a corporate environment, nor the familiar images of a band of 10-15 athletes playing a game “on any given Sunday”.
These “Social Teams”, can be massive groups of hundreds, or even thousands of people in an online setting.
They are teams on a scale never seen before, and on a playing field of incomprehensible proportions.  Team members may never have met each other, but nevertheless choose to work with each other to achieve a mutually desirable goal or function.
Social Teams are not top-down, nor bottom-up; they can be purposely set-up, or self-formed by team members; they can exist in purely social settings or as corporate sponsored groups.
They are a collection of individuals who have a common understanding of the “game they’re playing” (ie the team’s purpose); know in which goal they’re trying to score in (ie have a shared understanding of what ‘a win’ looks like); and are collaborating together to achieve that aim.
They incorporate the structure of a traditional team, with the social contract of a community.
Although Social Teams differ from the physical world in terms of the actual method and depth of their social interaction – many of the same rules for success in the offline world, hold true in the online world.
For example, if we use a typical amateur sports team as an analogy; we can define roles that need to be fulfilled by in order for the group to be successful: 1) A good Captain – someone to lead, motivate, organize and drive participation and effort from the team.  The best Captains are charismatic leaders who drive from the front; which entails being seen as a valuable contributor to the group; garnishing respect from other team members, and being effective networkers who are able to gel and glue the team together.
2) An astute Manager/Coach – someone to define and drive what is success for the team. To co-ordinate the team’s efforts, to let them know what game they’re playing when they get to the field, and in what direction they need to advance.
To provide them with a strategy, a formation, and to provide the team with the tools required to succeed – whether it be drafting in new players to bolster the squad, or providing appropriate training aids to keep players sharp.
3) Superstar Goal Scorers – people who might not always be the most active or hardworking on the field – but nonetheless are able to provide that spark of brilliance that will provide you with a large percentage of the goals, (or commercialized value) produced by your team.
4) A group of Creative Midfielders –ball/information distributors who make connections, provide links, and drive the conditions that create opportunities for goals to be scored.
5) A Solid Defense – the building blocks and foundation of the group – providing a core level of input, and information that gives the team a platform from which to build an attack.
Unlike the real world, in a Social Team, it’s important to point out that most of these positions are not usually assigned by anyone to anyone, but rather assumed with group permission by team members on their own.
This is not about imposing a hierarchical structure on a group of people, but rather about providing the team with the basis needed to work efficiently together towards a common goal.
Using this model, you can see how so many companies fail in their collaboration efforts.
By relying, as so many companies do, on simply “enabling a community” to exist, they’re essentially doing the equivalent of sitting on the sidelines of a soccer field waiting for 11 random people to find the field, collectively decide that they want to play the same game, and then set out to beat Arsenal Football Club with no organization at all.
I don’t know about you, but I think that’s folly – it’s time to let go of that folly and get a good game going.
So how do you use all this information to drive results within your collaboration efforts.
I’ll discuss that in my next post – in the meantime, as always, your comments and thoughts are gratefully received.

Comments : 14 Comments » Tags: collaboration

communities, corporate, definition, online communities, online teams, social captain, social defense, social manager, , social midfielder, social superstar, social teams, strategy, team roles, teamwork Categories : , Continuing the Conversation: For Companies, Build Teams, Not Communities.
8 12 2009 Yesterday I posted a response to all the wonderful comments and contributions that you all made to my last post on “Why Companies Shouldn’t Build Online Communities“.
As I plan to delve further into this idea of “Social Teams”, I thought I’d repost that reply as a post in its own right so as to make it easier for people to find and read – so here goes: Dear All Many, many thanks for your responses – they’re both very welcome and very appreciated.
I wanted to take some time to reply to some of the concerns that were expressed in the comments.
It seemed that many of you think I was advocating that companies should no longer value the input of large groups of people.
Far from it – the main point in the post was to point out that as a structure for large groups of people, the community concept is a flawed one – at least from a corporate perspective.
It’s simplistic, unstructured, and lacking in motivation and purpose to name but a few flaws.
That’s not to say that value can’t be created in a community setting – it’s just very hard to do so because you’re relying on value being created through serendipitous interactions between community members.
It’s not unlike advocating participating in the lottery as your prime way of getting rich – sure, it’s possible that you could hit the jackpot if you take part, but only a fool would rely on that as their sole chance at fame and fortune.
Likewise, whilst there is definitely a place for serendipity in an organization (more on that in a future post) – it would be a foolish management team that would rely on its occurrence to generate value for the company.  My argument instead is that the team framework is a much more robust and reliable one when it comes to generating value for a company.  In fact, in the few cases where looser community based initiatives have created value, I’ve found it’s usually because they began to adopt the characteristics and roles of a Social Team – namely things like purpose, direction, shared goals, diversity in skill sets and specialized roles, etc.
You could also make a good argument based on semantics – ie.

That a Social Team is merely a type of Community; however

I think it would be equally valid to say that a community is simply a dysfunctional Social Team.
I think it’s also important to point out I focus on strategies and processes specifically to drive corporate value.
Whilst I believe the Social Team concept still holds and still works in more social groups, the concept of what constitutes value and the expectation of it being created in those groups is very different to that of a large enterprise investing in this area.
Companies invest real money as well as intellectual capital into creating and participating in these networks, and as such, need to see a reasonable return, ideally on the bottom line to justify investing in these initiatives.
Having said that, my core belief is still that people function and perform better with a degree of organization when compared to loose collectives.
In addition, the visualization aid that thinking of these groups in a similar fashion to that of a sports team, gives us to analyze and improve the quality of that interaction is invaluable.

I’ll go deeper into the Social Team concept in future posts

but in the meantime – please do keep your comments coming, or contact me directly via e-mail or twitter (@bpluskowski) – to discuss this further.

Comments : 3 Comments » Tags: corporate

online communities, online teams, response, , social teams, strategy, teamwork Categories : , Why Companies shouldn’t build Online Communities.
22 10 2009 Forget about Communities.
Don’t do it.
Don’t even think about it.
Oh I know that communities are all the rage currently – companies are falling over themselves to create, build and own their very own communities: Communities of Employees, Communities of Customers, Communities of Interest Groups, Communities, Communities, Communities….
But with all of these efforts out there, how many of them are yielding real tangible results for the sponsoring organization.
It seems that the very concept of communities is a flawed one for most corporations – leading to wasted time, money and effort – and I think I know why.
Let me explain: I find that many, maybe even most, companies approach social media, and other online community projects – with very little, if any, forethought on how value will be achieved as a result of jumping on this particular bandwagon.
They seem to share a belief that value will just “be created” by the mere existence of a new online channel; that innovation will simply appear if you provide a new collaborative tool; that competitive advantage will be retained through the “ownership” of a new networking group.  Yet that’s rarely ever the case.
Unlike in the movie “Field of Dreams” – you can build it – but “they” rarely come spontaneously – or if they do, they may well end up playing a jovial game of scrabble rather than a vintage MLB baseball game on the back lawn.
Even the word Community itself is somewhat flawed when applied to a corporate setting: Here’s the Dictionary.com definition of the word: com⋅mu⋅ni⋅ty  [kuh–myoo-ni-tee] –noun, plural -ties.
1.
a social group of any size whose members reside in a specific locality, share government, and often have a common cultural and historical heritage.
2.
a locality inhabited by such a group.
3.
a social, religious, occupational, or other group sharing common characteristics or interests and perceived or perceiving itself as distinct in some respect from the larger society within which it exists (usually prec.
by the): the business community; the community of scholars.
4.
a group of associated nations sharing common interests or a common heritage: the community of Western Europe.
5.
Ecclesiastical.
a group of men or women leading a common life according to a rule.
6.
Ecology.
an assemblage of interacting populations occupying a given area.
7.
joint possession, enjoyment, liability, etc.: community of property.
8.
similar character; agreement; identity: community of interests.
9.
the community, the public; society: the needs of the community.
There’s a lot of nice words and feelings in that definition.
“A social group”; “common heritage”; “interacting populations”; “shared identity”….
The word conjures up a nice warm vision of a collection of friends and associates sitting around a fireside or, for the more cynical among you,  images of suburban old age homes in Florida and Arizona maybe.
As I look at that definition however- I ask myself – where’s the value in that for a company.
Where does it get created.
Augmented.
Shared.
Delivered.
Whichever way you look at it, communities are about people gathering with no set agenda or action in mind – so why would a company invest/waste resources to simply enable random conversations amongst a group of people?  At best, it’s an exercise in corporate branding to be associated with a particular conversation topic; at worst it’s an exercise in wishful thinking.
At the recent World Business Forum, held in New York City on Oct 6-7, Patrick Lencioni (founder and president of the Table Group, and a fantastically articulate and dynamic speaker incidentally) spoke to the audience about “What makes a good team?”.  One specific question stuck with me: “If you have a bunch of people who play in a sports team each week, really get on well with each other socially, gel as a unit, yet still manage to not win a single game – are they a good team?” Patrick asked with a mischevious look  at the front row and a pause for effect.  “The answer is NO – they’re just a bunch of LOSERS!” (cue laughter and some nervous side glances between executives either side of me).
Whilst maybe declared a tad glibly by Patrick, the core message was clear, and it got me thinking about what had been bothering me with the concept of communities for so long: That lack of performance, of achievement, of purpose.
It struck me that the relative value of the concept of “communities” to most organizations is not dissimilar to Patrick’s example of a team that doesn’t win – they are, in essence, Losers.
And why would companies waste time creating groups of Losers.
It seems to me that the failure companies are making starts right at the beginning with a badly formed misconception as to what they really need – and it’s not an online community – it’s an online team.
It may seem as if I’m nit-picking or playing with semantics in making this differentiation – but consider what this simple change in mindset would mean to projects as you think about how to build a great online team instead of an online community.  All of a sudden you add dimensions of: Direction and Leadership.
Shared Goals, Shared Failures, and Shared Successes.
Ensuring Participation of Diverse Skill Sets.
Tangible Achievement.
Passion, Purpose and Loyalty.
Whist still retaining all the collaborative, cooperative and creative structures usually associated with Communities.
I don’t know about you – but I know which one I’d rather build.
You tell me – What’s the more powerful concept?….

Comments : 25 Comments » Tags: corporate

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Is your Community Contaminated?.
21 07 2010 [tweetmeme]This morning I found myself at the W Hotel in Hoboken, accidentally (no really!) listening to an interesting story on one of the many breakfast shows on at that time.
On that show, author James Fowler was describing research he had done that showed how social networks surrounding us can impact each of our lives in a much deeper way than most people realize.
To make his point, (and the news presumably) he used as an example that divorce can be “contagious” amongst friends – mentioning that having a close friend experience divorce, increases the chance of your own divorce by 147%.
Needless to say shock and horror ensued from the hosts and other assorted pundits on the show who naturally dislike the idea of someone asserting such high correlation to such a dreadful outcome.
Yet when I thought about it, I don’t think I was really surprised.
After all, it kind of makes sense.
Your social circle represents more than just a group of people you like to get together with for a beer.
Your social circle represents the segment of society (or community) with whom you most closely identify and associate.
As with any society, the activities of one affect the activities of the many – word of mouth campaigns are one of many business efforts to capitalize on this effect.  Communities and Societies have social norms and unspoken rules that govern membership – and it’s only natural when an outlier emerges (say, the first of your group goes bungee jumping on holiday, learns how to scuba dive, or, god forbid, gets divorced) that the community takes a moment to reflect on whether that new behavior or activity is a true outlier or simply a leading indicator of something they too should be trying/considering/experimenting.
The elements of peer pressure and groupthink are not new either – it’s well known that many people get into/stay in gangs, or conform group actions against their natural wills because of the innate fear of rejection/fear of social stigmata/fear of ridicule/fear of the unknown that we all suffer from.
Humans are inherently social creatures, so why would we be surprised that the social actions of someone we know, like and respect would also impact our own decisions.
Take the divorce case – the first person to get divorced in a social group of couples challenges the group norms.
All of a sudden the group has to decide whether or not they approve – whether or not to maintain the two separates in the combined.
Once that norm has been broken, it’s only normal for the rest of the group to question their own commitment to what they had considered a societal norm of marriage.  I daresay that if the author had dug further (and he may well have by the way, I haven’t had a chance to read his book yet, and it was a short segment on the program), he would’ve actually gone on to find that whether or not other couples in the group started to consider divorce would also have been impacted by the relative happiness exhibited by the two singles that initiated the first divorce.
Did the initial sadness give way to euphoria commensurate with a perpetual trip to Hedonism III.
Did the two newly single people now face a miserable existence akin to that of a lonely penguin in the Sahara.
Our understanding of alternative realities in the communities to which we belong influence our own decisions by opening up an understanding of what those alternatives actually look and feel like in real life.
If we find our close friends being happier single than married, then it’s only natural for us to consider a similar move.
There are implications of course, for the Social Business World in all this of course (I bet you were wondering when I’d get to the point of all this, eh?).
Social communities maintained (or not) by businesses are fickle things – more akin to organic creatures than to mathematical formulas (which adds to my confusion as to why so many companies seem to be lumping in the Social Media functions with their SEO functions internally – but that’s a different discussion) – and the analogy of new societal norms spreading through a community like a virus is just as accurate, if not more so, in the social world.
Engender a strong goodwill and feeling within your community, and you’ll find that it’ll be resistant to negative vibes.
Take the iPhone 4 – despite all its difficulties and problems, people are still buying it – not because it’s that much of a better phone than anything else on the market (nor even its previous version the 3GS) – but rather because Apple’s conditioned its community to be resistant to negative viruses by ensuring that they not only respond, but also try to over-satisfy the customer whenever possible.
As a result.

The community of Apple buyers continues strong

and continues to grow in number.
Cross your community though, and that bad feeling will spread far and wide like wildfire.
You only have to look at the many Facebook faux pas of the likes of Nestle and others to see that at work.
It strikes me then, that we might well start seeing a new type of competitive behavior showing up in the future – that of setting up deliberate social viruses to attack and/or convert the social networks of competitors.  I can certainly envision ways in which companies could manipulate a few key individuals to enable them to corrupt a competitor’s user community for example – sowing seeds of discontent, and setting up the consumers to be virally vulnerable to the possibility of alternative realities.  Could we then be on the verge of a new weapon in the Corporate Strategic Arsenal.
In many ways we need to nurture a new skillset in corporations – that of the Social Doctor – Able to diagnose potential viruses prior to them taking effect and injecting the corporate social world with the virtual equivalent of vitamins to re-enforce it.
Part strategists, and part social scientists, this new breed of business executive will need to show a sensitivity and concern for customer communities that is currently alien to the majority of companies who still treat their social networks as a sales and marketing tool rather than a living, breathing symbiotic organism.
Mix that social awareness and responsiveness with corporate strategic ability though – and you get the ability to build and maintain a Social World that will drive unrivalled competitive advantage in your direction.
What do you think.

Comments : 14 Comments » Tags: Apple

communities, community, competitive advantage, competitive behavior, connected, corporate, divorce, facebook, goodwill, infection, infectious, iphone 4, james fowler, loyalty, nestle, social circle, social doctor, social rules, social science, social team, social world, strategy Categories : , Defining the “Social Team”.
9 02 2010 [tweetmeme]If you’ve been following me online on Twitter or elsewhere, you’ve probably heard me mention the concept of “Social Teams” more than a few times recently.
It is, in my mind, a powerful idea that has the ability to change the way companies and individuals view online collaboration efforts – with the potential to achieve dramatic results.
I’ve always believed that people want to interact online in a similar structure to their interactions in the offline world.
The fact that we’re not usually able to doesn’t mean that we don’t want to.
In the real world, we associate ourselves with communities to find people of similar interests with whom to interact.
These communities are important to define the overall population of socially connected people; but they’re useless as a way to actually get anything done.  When we set out to actually achieve something, we abandon the broader “community” concept in favor of focused subgroups of active individuals that are more motivated and able to get things done.
For example, in my sport of choice, rugby, we talk about a wider “rugby community” around the world.
When we go out, we socialize, drink, and have fun as a community – it’s a bond that ties rugby players around the world.
But we don’t compete as a community, we compete as individual teams.
We don’t govern the sport as a community, but rather using an elected “team” of individuals picked from the community.
In other words we “exist” as a community, but we “achieve” as a team.
The same concept is true in the online world.
Technology has given us the methods by which to define and connect to, our own communities.  Each of us “exists” within a multitude of communities with which we  associate – with differing levels of interest.
However, to actually achieve a specific aim/goal, we need to tap into a subset of that group to create a “team” to help us achieve that.
It’s important to understand that whilst I use the term “team”, these sub-groups of people don’t exactly conform to the standard idea of what a “team” looks like or acts like – we’re no longer looking at working groups of enlisted employees in a corporate environment, nor the familiar images of a band of 10-15 athletes playing a game “on any given Sunday”.
These “Social Teams”, can be massive groups of hundreds, or even thousands of people in an online setting.
They are teams on a scale never seen before, and on a playing field of incomprehensible proportions.  Team members may never have met each other, but nevertheless choose to work with each other to achieve a mutually desirable goal or function.
Social Teams are not top-down, nor bottom-up; they can be purposely set-up, or self-formed by team members; they can exist in purely social settings or as corporate sponsored groups.
They are a collection of individuals who have a common understanding of the “game they’re playing” (ie the team’s purpose); know in which goal they’re trying to score in (ie have a shared understanding of what ‘a win’ looks like); and are collaborating together to achieve that aim.
They incorporate the structure of a traditional team, with the social contract of a community.
Although Social Teams differ from the physical world in terms of the actual method and depth of their social interaction – many of the same rules for success in the offline world, hold true in the online world.
For example, if we use a typical amateur sports team as an analogy; we can define roles that need to be fulfilled by in order for the group to be successful: 1) A good Captain – someone to lead, motivate, organize and drive participation and effort from the team.  The best Captains are charismatic leaders who drive from the front; which entails being seen as a valuable contributor to the group; garnishing respect from other team members, and being effective networkers who are able to gel and glue the team together.
2) An astute Manager/Coach – someone to define and drive what is success for the team. To co-ordinate the team’s efforts, to let them know what game they’re playing when they get to the field, and in what direction they need to advance.
To provide them with a strategy, a formation, and to provide the team with the tools required to succeed – whether it be drafting in new players to bolster the squad, or providing appropriate training aids to keep players sharp.
3) Superstar Goal Scorers – people who might not always be the most active or hardworking on the field – but nonetheless are able to provide that spark of brilliance that will provide you with a large percentage of the goals, (or commercialized value) produced by your team.

4) A group of Creative Midfielders –ball/information distributors who make connections

provide links, and drive the conditions that create opportunities for goals to be scored.
5) A Solid Defense – the building blocks and foundation of the group – providing a core level of input, and information that gives the team a platform from which to build an attack.
Unlike the real world, in a Social Team, it’s important to point out that most of these positions are not usually assigned by anyone to anyone, but rather assumed with group permission by team members on their own.
This is not about imposing a hierarchical structure on a group of people, but rather about providing the team with the basis needed to work efficiently together towards a common goal.
Using this model, you can see how so many companies fail in their collaboration efforts.
By relying, as so many companies do, on simply “enabling a community” to exist, they’re essentially doing the equivalent of sitting on the sidelines of a soccer field waiting for 11 random people to find the field, collectively decide that they want to play the same game, .

And then set out to beat Arsenal Football Club with no organization at all

I don’t know about you, but I think that’s folly – it’s time to let go of that folly and get a good game going.
So how do you use all this information to drive results within your collaboration efforts.
I’ll discuss that in my next post – in the meantime, as always, your comments and thoughts are gratefully received.

Comments : 14 Comments » Tags: collaboration

communities, corporate, definition, online communities, online teams, social captain, social defense, social manager, , social midfielder, social superstar, social teams, strategy, team roles, teamwork Categories : , What in the Wide World is Web 3.0.
– Let’s find out….
22 09 2009 So it all started with a bit of a joke – I was chatting to moderator-extraordinaire @sourcePOV (Chris Jones’ alias on Twitter to the rest of you) at the end of a particularly well attended #smchat session to brainstorm some ideas for future chat topics (click here to find out more about #smchat).  “Hey”, I said with tongue firmly in cheek, “we’ve been talking about social media and web 2.0 for some time now… aren’t we due another point release soon?”….
Chris, with what I’m now realizing is a rather impressive ability to spot an opportunity, quickly managed to convert my offhand quip into a somewhat tenuous agreement to take over from him as moderator for next week’s #smchat gathering, with rather daunting task of leading the 50+ participants through “Qu.20” – figuring out what Web 3.0 is, might be, or would be, if it is anything at all – and then trying to understand the impact on business and beyond.
I found myself wondering if this was how Justin Timberlake found himself not only guest hosting Saturday Night Life, but then also in tights and high heels for a parody of Beyonce’s “Single Ladies”… At some point he must’ve found himself thinking “How the heck….?”…  I guess in retrospect I should thank my lucky stars that I get to keep my trousers on to host #smchat… Taking a closer look at the topic though, led me to some very interesting search into a future that really isn’t that far away – (many experts seem to suggest that Web 3.0 will be a real entity as close as 2010) – but one that is still unclear and the center of some debate as to what it really is, will be, and what it will mean.
Let’s take a quick look down the “point release” history of the Web: Web 0.0 was the first interactions between computers – the beginning of a networked world as it evolved.
Crude, and of limited use (by today’s standards), but a huge step change on what was possible with individual computers.
Web 1.0 took the next step and evolved protocols and common language to begin making sense and use the growing “web” of interconnected computers in both the private and public sectors.
Data was primarily pushed at you with little intelligence about how and why; and content creation and distribution was the sole domain of the website owner.
However it spawned a wealth of business models that managed to take advantage of a new, non-physical channel by which to sell and promote goods and services.

Web 2.0 introduced the concept of a two way web – with users not only reading information

but also writing, contributing, and creating content.
It’s given birth to the business models of co-creation, open innovation networks, crowd sourcing, wisdom of crowd approaches, and enough buzzwords to run a truly interesting and diverse game of “buzzword bingo” at the office.  It’s also introduced the concept of data and application mobility and a whole new level of interconnectedness with open standards beginning to evolve and standardize how machines, even from competing brands, talk to each other.
It’s a social, collaborative, and altogether more responsive and interactive web that is no longer just a tool, but a part of us and how we interact with the wider world around us.
So bearing in mind that marketing guys can be as unoriginal as a mullet at a Lynard Skynard concert when it comes to naming new concepts – we know a Web 3.0 is on its way – but what, if anything, will it be.
Here’s a nice little short movie from Dutch think tank EPN which does a nice job of introducing the Web 3.0 concept in relation to what’s gone before: I don’t know about you, but I’m quite excited to see what the #smchat participants will come up with (Bet you’re jealous now Chris.
:p ) – and to better prepare you all to discuss the topic.

Here’s some background reading on what some people think the Web 3.0

along with a list of some of the questions we’ll try to tackle on Wednesday: Q20a) What is Web 3.0.
So what will Web3.0 bring us.

Will it simply be a natural extension of Web 2.0

Will it just be a marketing gimmick devised by bored marketers looking to revitalize and differentiate a market where almost everything has been branded with a “2.0” by now.
Or something totally different.
Alan Cho wrote a pretty nice article on the subject last year that does a good job of amalgamating some of the current arguments out there into a comprehensive prediction of what Web 3.0 might be characterized by, including: –       The advent of a truly intelligent web – the development of contextual searches will finally make sense of the plethora of online information and will eventually spawn intelligent web applications able fully understand what you’re really looking for in natural English.
–       New levels of Openness and Increased levels of Interoperability – with users being able to skip from device to device and application to application using one single ID to seamlessly manage their online world – with the web being seen as essentially one really huge database.  A worldwide cloud without edges if you will.
–       A 3 dimensional web – not only in terms of Second Life type Avatars, but also crossing into the real world and integrating into everything you own.
The web becomes an additional layer of information overlaying all aspects of your life, enriching the information flow your eyes process.
Q20b) What will be the hallmarks of a Web 3.0 world and how will it revolutionize the world.
Here’s a more academic view of Web 3.0 by a UCal professor: Q20c) When will Web 3.0 be officially here.

The phrase “Web 2.0” was apparently coined in 2003 by Dale Dougherty

a vice-president at O’Reilly Media , and the phrase became popular in 2004.
Some experts are saying that if the next fundamental change happened in roughly the same time span, .

Web 3.0 will be knocking on our doors sometime around 2015

Others seem to think that it could be upon us as soon as 2010.
Time for all you Nostradamus wannabe’s to get your diving rods out on this one.
Q20d) What are the barriers to W3.0.
What’s stopping us from getting there.
What are the major barriers that companies and consumers need to overcome.
And what are the enabling features.
And finally, .

What I think is the most important question: Q20e) What does Web 3.0 mean for businesses

In this amusing interchange with a journalist, Eric Schmidt of Google gives a brief insight into what he thinks are some of the implications of web 3.0 including an interesting prediction that “Applications will be distributed in a viral manner” in the future.
Want more.
Some further suggested reading: http://www.labnol.org/internet/web-3-concepts-explained/8908/ – has a bunch of presentations from various peoples on what web3.0 might end up being.
http://computer.howstuffworks.com/web-30.htm – a good comprehensive look at all elements of Web 3.0 http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2102865,00.asp – A nearby vision of how web 3.0 is evolving (hopefully not with all the annoying ads their site seems to be overridden with though…) This #SMCHAT will be held on Wednesday, September 23rd, 2009 at 1PM EST on Twitter.
If you’ve never participated in a Twitter chat before – here’s a useful post by Jeff Hurt that can help you get started.
And if you want to suggest some more questions for us to tackle (time permitting) feel free to post your suggestions in the comments below or via twitter on @bpluskowski  – See you on Wednesday.

Comments : 2 Comments » Tags: #smchat

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Track a Cheating Girl/Boyfriend

Track a Cheating Girl/Boyfriend.
September 22, 2016 Comments: 0 Spying on your partner is a bad idea for sure.
Snooping around somebody’s stuff is unethical.
But when two people are in a relationship, they share love and trust.
If one of them gets the whiff of betrayal, keeping it under control can be real difficult.
There are obvious signs which prove your doubts.
Hiring a private investigator is going to be expensive business.
Asking right out may infuriate the other person and end it up altogether.
Girls tends to be stealthy and according to science can lie more whereas men can make you look like a complete idiot with their oh-so-good dialogues.
So what to do.
There has to be a way which does not make you act like a fool right.
Cheating is wrong on so many levels and is clearly unforgivable.
The best option, if you get to know that your girlfriend/boyfriend are cheating is being straight to the point but if things don’t stop, you might end up doing something.
Checking the phone can clear doubts as call logs and text messages can be checked but if you are caught while doing so, it could not possibly get worse than this.

Tracking his/her cell phone can get you answers

Through tracking you will be able to monitor their every move and all whereabouts.
A number of tracking software and mobile applications are available in the market right now which you only need to get installed in your cheating girlfriend/boyfriend’s cell phone and guess what.
They would not even know because the app is hidden and user cannot see it.
With the help so many tracking devices like flexispy, mspy, coupletracker, highster etc are available which all provide you with secret tracking services.
You will be able to virtually see his/her every move.
This neat little app is invisible and untraceable.
You can have all the data regarding calls made and received, as well as incoming and outgoing text messages and photos.
You can know where they stayed and for how long they traveled.
With help of these tracking software, you can easily see and find prove if in fact they are cheating on you or not.
And dear, do not beat yourself up over this.
It is better to be sure when confronting someone.
But make sure that if you are really getting the signs or hints that your boyfriend or girlfriend are not loyal to you , only then you can use this option.
Do not try to do this for fun as it can really ruin a relationship.
When a relation is at the verge of breaking you can do so to satisfy yourself or may be prove to yourself that it happened for a reason.
Spying is not considered to be very nice but sometimes, people we love, or those which we trusted completely end up lying or cheating to us.
So just to be sure that how long they have been doing this to you or your relation, this software will help you to get a clear picture.
Read also: signs that your girlfriend is cheating on you and phone tracking aftermath – your girlfriend is cheating on you Leave a Reply Cancel reply.
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Microsoft DHCP Documentation Script Update Version 1.44

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Microsoft DHCP Documentation Script Update Version 1.44.
April 28, 2020 0 Comments Version 1.44 8-May-2020 Add checking for a Word version of 0, which indicates the Office installation needs repairing Add Receive Side Scaling setting to Function OutputNICItem Change color variables Continue reading.

Microsoft DHCP Documentation Script Update Version 1.43

April 17, 2020 0 Comments Version 1.43 17-Apr-2020 Add parameter IncludeOptions to add DHCP Options to report.
New Function ProcessDHCPOptions Update Functions ShowScriptOptions and ProcessScriptEnd Update Help Text Cleanu Continue reading.
The Mysterious Microsoft DHCP Option ID 81.
April 16, 2020 0 Comments Recently I worked on a project where I needed to create a PowerShell script to automate the creation of numerous Microsoft DHCP servers and all their scopes, scope options, reservations, all settings.
Continue reading.

Microsoft DHCP Documentation Script Update Version 1.40

April 5.

2018 0 Comments In more ways than a simple bump from 1.35 to 1.40

this update feels like a new version.
In doing Active Directory Health Checks, I “eat my own dog food” and use a lot of my scripts to gather data Continue reading.

Microsoft DHCP Documentation Script Update Version 1.35

February 10, 2018 0 Comments #Version 1.35 10-Feb-2018 Added four new Cover Page properties Company Address Company Email Company Fax Company Phone Added Log switch to create a transcript log Added function TranscriptLogging Continue reading.

Microsoft DHCP Documentation Script Update Version 1.32

November 7, 2016 0 Comments #Version 1.32 7-Nov-2016 Added Chinese language support You can always find the most current script by going to https://carlwebster.com/where-to-get-copies-of-the-documentation-scripts/ Thanks Webste Continue reading.

Microsoft DHCP Documentation Script Update Version 1.31

October 24, 2016 0 Comments Version 1.31 24-Oct-2016 Add HTML output Fix typo on failover status “iitializing” -> “initializing” Fix numerous issues where I used .day/.hour/.minute instead of .days/.h Continue reading.

Microsoft DHCP Documentation Script Update Version 1.30

May 4, 2016 0 Comments Version 1.30 4-May-2016 Fixed numerous issues discovered with the latest update to PowerShell V5 Color variables needed to be [long] and not [int] except for $wdColorBlack which is 0 Changed from usi Continue reading.

Microsoft DHCP Documentation Script Update Version 1.24

February 8, 2016 0 Comments Version 1.24 8-Feb-2016 Added specifying an optional output folder Added the option to email the output file Fixed several spacing and typo errors You can always find the most current script by goin Continue reading.
Script Updates Coming.
February 8, 2016 0 Comments It is amazing what I learn about my scripts when I do projects for customers who use the various documentation scripts on an almost daily basis.

I will be adding two feature requests to all the script Continue reading

Microsoft DHCP Documentation Script Update Version 1.22

November 25, 2015 0 Comments Help text was updated to give download links for RSAT for Windows 8, Windows 8.1 and Windows 10.
ReadMe file was updated for RSAT for Windows 10.

Readme file was updated to show an example of running Continue reading

Documentation Scripts Updated for Word 2016 Support.
October 5, 2015 6 Comments The following scripts have been updated to add support for Word 2016 in all 11 supported languages.
Active Directory DHCP Provisioning Services StoreFront (Client script update 7-Oct-2015) VMware vSp Continue reading.

Microsoft DHCP Documentation Script Update Version 1.2

April 27, 2015 0 Comments A user emailed me saying the DHCP script just didn’t work.
Turns out he was running the script with no parameters and the script failed to test if the default LocalHost was a DHCP Server.
This h Continue reading.
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The Visible man was seen more in the mainstream stores

Visible Woman.
January 15, 2009 3 Comments This was another cool toy I found at the toy show in San Jose.
I’ve seen the visible man before, but this was the first time I had seen the woman.
Super Toy Show San JoseBattlestar Galactica Viper Launch Station 3 thoughts on “Visible Woman”.
Fredg61 February 25, 2009 at 11:13 am I remeber seeing this as a kid back in the 60’s maybe early 70’s.
There were not that many as I remember.
The Visible man was seen more in the mainstream stores.
Nice post.
Reply.
Olga September 1, 2009 at 9:12 am I have one just wondering how much is she worth.
Reply September 8, 2009 at 5:06 pm The one at the toy show was selling for $25.
Reply.
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Charity Board Game Day May 4, 2019.
April 4, 2019.
Facebook.
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Join BGA & Fanwood Presbyterian Church as we host Charity Board Game Day

As we support those in need of food locally & those who are in need of an education internationally.
A full day of learning new games, rediscovering classics and playing your favorites, while making new friends and supporting those in need.
We will be holding raffles, a silent board game auction and having tournaments throughout the day.
Food and drink will be available all day or bring your own.
Please spread the word to others.
A $10 donation is suggested.
Space is limited and not guaranteed.
RSVP to ensure a spot.
Please bring games to teach and lend others.
100% of all money collected goes to charity.
If you would like to auction your games your games off to the public, we only ask for a $10 donation and you keep wining bids.
If you would like to make a donation for the charity to the event and/or if you would like to volunteer please contact me at [email protected] If you cannot come but would like to give: 1.
click the link below, 2.
next click ‘Here to Quick Give’, 3.
click, ‘continue quick give’, 4.

Enter your credit card information and under Gift Information/ Fund

drop down to Mission Trips and all of your gift minus the credit card fee will go to providing a university education to Nicaragua graduates.
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ENGN 133 – What’s the Deal With: Deckbuilders.
Episode 215 – If You Like Wingspan, Try….
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Scott Pilgrim’s Precious Little Card Game is a thematic deckbuilding card game for 1-4.
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Werewolf Tycoon is a fun addition to any game library

Werewolf Tycoon.
Posted on January 28, .

2015 by • 0 Comments Graphics – 10/10

Gameplay – 9/10.
Replay Value – 7.5/10.
Originality – 9.5/10.
( votes) Sending Werewolf Tycoon is a uniquely fun, stealth eating game.

The graphics in Werewolf tycoon are great

There is an intentional pixilation to the user Interface (UI)

characters, and environments, that bring a full feeling of nostalgia.
As everything is done in the same style, the graphics are cohesive throughout–nothing takes the player out of the immersive game.
The animations are fluid, such as when the werewolf devours an civilian, solider, reporter, or alien, or leaps from its hiding spot in the park bush.
The environment is beautifully rendered, and the intentional pixilation adds a lot to the game.
In this case, less (pixels) is truly more.
Ads are also kept to the menu pages, so they do not interrupt game play or detract from the graphics.
As for the game play, it is simple to play but difficult to master.
It requires strategy, as players must eat at least one victim each night so as to not starve, but also avoid getting too much attention.
A single reporter snapping a photo and escaping and the army is called in, meaning it’s lights out for Mr.
werewolf.
Overall.

Werewolf Tycoon allows players to become the big bad wolf of legend

admire what small eyes the citizens have from hiding, and swallow them whole when the cameras aren’t around.

Perhaps the only thing really off about Werewolf Tycoon is its title

it makes sense as a tycoon can mean someone of great power, and werewolves are traditionally human beings who are cursed.
However.

Using Tycoon often makes players think of games like Roller Coaster Tycoon and Zoo Tycoon

which will damage the store star rating if people go in expecting something customizable and vast, rather than a clean, responsive, endless score climber.
Other than this, the game runs the risk of becoming a little repetitive, but it does offer fun and challenging achievements and a score board, so this isn’t a huge issue.
All in all, Werewolf Tycoon is a fun addition to any game library, especially those with an affinity for the horror genre.

Free To Play – Ads are Non-intrusive

Responsive Controls.
Great Graphics.
Achievements and Leaderboards.
Can Grow Repetitive.
Tycoon in Title Can Confuse.
Werewolf Tycoon – Become the Big Bad Wolf of Werewolf Park in this werewolf stealth simulation game. Eat as many people as you can, but pace yourself, try not to be seen, and do not let witnesses escape.
After all, things could get tricky if too many people become aware of your existence! Happy munching.
Download Werewolf Tycoon.
Download QR-Code ‎Werewolf Tycoon Joe Williamson Download QR-Code Werewolf Tycoon Joe Williamson.
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Different levels and a final Hardcore Mode serve as reward

Fairy King.
Posted on December 16, .

2014 by • 0 Comments Graphics – 6/10

Gameplay – 7/10.
Replay Value – 7/10.
6/10.

6.5/10 (6 votes) Sending

Free To Play.
Seasonal Levels (Halloween, Christmas).
Can Grow Repetitive.
App description.
Once upon a time the King of the Fairies went for a walk outside of his kingdom to collect flowers.
All of a sudden the ground started shaking and his fairy folk were transformed into evil blocks, which seal his path home.

Help the mighty Fairy King to find his way back to the fairy kingdom

Use the force of his magic wand to release the enchanted blocks, for the survival of the mighty Fairy King and his people lies now in your hands. Fairy King offers demanding entertainment, based on skill and reaction.
Different levels and a final Hardcore Mode serve as reward, which provide variety and long-lasting fun.
Addiction level: high! Global Leaderboard is coming soon… Fairy King offers demanding entertainment, based on skill and reaction.
Different levels and a final Hardcore Mode serve as reward, which provide variety and long-lasting fun.
Addiction level: high.
Download Fairy King.
Download QR-Code Fairy King Oliver Muller Download QR-Code Fairy King couch developers The app was not found in the store.
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2014 Leave a comment Well

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Tag Archives: April, 2014 A to Z Blogging Challenge.
Slower Signups by RPG Bloggers to this Year’s A to Z Challenge.
March 11, 2015 3 Comments For last year’s A to Z Challenge I made a group of links of RPG bloggers that signed up for the 2014 A to Z Challenge.
There were a lot of them, twenty-one by my count.
So far, there are nine RPG bloggers, counting me, signed up for the 2015 challenge.
Will there be a slew of last minute sign ups, or will the trickle until the deadline be it.
I can see that this is not for everyone.
I find it a good way to get the creative juices flowing as it forces you to think.
Coming up with a coherent theme even more of a challenge.
As with the rest of my blogging, I use it to share my ideas, and to gather and organize ideas for my campaign(s).
Players don’t always appreciate or get to see all the details.
Blogging helps to get the ideas out there and to distill them to the bare essentials needed for presentation in actual play.
Also four years of college note taking and three years of grad school note taking ruined my handwriting.
If I’m not careful when I write, even I can’t read it.
I used to get A’s in penmanship.
So typing makes it easier for me to go back and read what I wrote.
:/ April, 2014 A to Z.
May 1, 2014 Leave a comment Well, I made it.
Doing 26 posts is not too hard.
The hardest part was coming up with a topic for each letter of the alphabet.
I did not have a them, other than RPGs for this blog and genealogy for my genealogy blog.
I scheduled each letter ahead of time, so if I did not have a topic, I could add it when I got to it.
I had my RPG blog done well before the end of April.
My genealogy blog I had a couple I let slip up on me and I did them that day.
I should have kept a backlog in my scheduled postings, but I did not.
Now to build up a buffer to tide me over for the days I am busy.
Day 26 Z is for Zombie.
April 30.

2014 Leave a comment April 30

2014 In D&D, zombies are slow, lumbering undead.
They are created by evil magic users from the corpses of the dead.
They are so slow that they attack last every round.
A good cleric has a chance to turn them and make them leave the cleric and his party alone for a time.
A high enough level cleric will turn them to dust instead of turning them away.
An evil cleric has a chance to take over the zombies and command them.
This holds true for all types of undead.
Unlike recent movies and TV shows, a wound from a zombie does not turn you into a zombie when you die.
One could make the case that a corpse attacking you gives you a chance of catching a disease.
They are also not brain eaters.
They are merely undead used as guards and cannon fodder by the bad guys.
Day 25 Y is for Yelling.
April 29.

2014 Leave a comment April 29

2014 Yelling and screaming in a dungeon is a good way to attract the unwanted attention of monsters.
Yelling and screaming while role playing is a good way to attract the attention of your parents or your non role playing spouse, or your neighbors if the windows are open in nice weather.
Yelling and screaming can be a sign of imminent danger for the characters in the dungeon, but is often a sign of a good time in the course of role playing.
Sometimes there is roaring with laughter, yelling at a poor roll, grieving at the loss of a favorite character or NPC.

If it involves a disagreement in real life among players or DM

then the DM needs to step in and straighten it out.
The whole point of RPGs is to have fun while playing your preferred version of make-believe with rules.
May all your yelling be part of role playing and a sign of a good time.
Day 24 X is for Xorn.
April 28, 2014 2 Comments April 28, 2014 There are not a lot of X words in D&D that come to mind.
There is a monster in the Monster Manual called a Xorn.
It looks like living rock with three arms and three legs and a mouth on top of its head.
It can move through rock and seeks out metal to eat.
The same metals adventurers prize, copper, silver, gold, etc.
They are very tough and hard to fight.
They are of average intelligence, so you can reason/bribe them to leave you alone with the right amount of gold for them to eat.

I have never ran into one as a player or used one as a DM

Day 23 W is for War.
April 26.

2014 Leave a comment April 26

2014 War is a common theme in fantasy and science fiction.
In the realm of RPG’s there are various ways that wars play into things.
Wars as a part of the back story/history of the current situation in the campaign.
This can be just a quick mention, or be more elaborate depending on the GM.
Wars as part of rumors and news of faraway places the players may not or will never go.
Wars as part of infighting between bad guys.
The players may or may not learn of this.
If they do learn of it, they may choose to stay out of it, or get involved to make sure the least bad one wins; and then go after the now weakened bad guy.
Wars as something the players are involved in.
This can take several forms: The players elect to join in and help the side they favor.
The players have stirred up the bad guys to the point of war.
This can happen in a way that the players may not know it is coming, and not be available to help.
The players have caused some sort of diplomatic incident and started a war.
Again, the players may not know about this, or they may find themselves in deep trouble if they can’t avert it.
The players decide to go off to where there is a war or fighting they have heard about and get involved on the side of the “good guys”.
The “good guys” may or may not really be “good guys”.
This can make for interesting role playing.
Day 22 V is for Vorpal Blade.
April 25.

2014 Leave a comment April 25

2014 The term Vorpal Blade is from a line in the poem Jabberwocky from the Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland sequel, Through the Looking Glass.
One, two.
One, two.
and through and through The vorpal blade went snicker-snack.
He left it dead, and with its head He went galumphing back.
Vorpal is a nonsense word, but from the context of the poem, it is understood to be a blade capable of decapitation.
It entered the world of D&D meaning a magic sword with an increased tendency to decapitate one’s opponent, or to severe a limb.
Day 21 U is for Unicorns.
April 24, 2014 4 Comments April 24, 2014 Unicorns in D&D are the classic image of unicorns in literature, a horse with a single horn sprouting from its forehead.
Like mythology, in D&D they are magical creatures that are nearly impossible to catch.
Human and elven maids of pure heart can tame them and use them for steeds.
Some have combined the winged horses, pegasi, and unicorns, to come up with flying unicorns.
What do you call them, unipegs, pegicorns, or just flying unicorns.
Day 20 T is for Treasure.
April 23.

2014 Leave a comment April 23

2014 Treasure, gold, silver, gems, jewels, and magic are the goal of the hearty adventurers who dare risk entering a dungeon or other place rumored to have treasure.
One can even find treasure maps in the treasure hoards one finds.
These maps lead the way to further adventure.
Treasure can be just a few coins off a slain orc, or a hoard of a dragon.
Adventurers have quite the time because once they get the treasure, they may still have to survive to get to the exit to the dungeon, much like the opening scene of Raiders of the Lost Ark.
Sometimes rival adventurers may let your party risk all the danger, only to take what you have brought forth.
Day 19 S is for Sandbox.
April 22.

2014 Leave a comment April 22

2014 A sandbox in RPG terms is generally a starting area or setting where the adventurers can go in whatever direction they choose and find adventure.

As they expand their explorations the DM/GM adds to the fringes of the sandbox

The simplest example is a town for a home base/safe place to rest, recuperate, sell off loot, and restock for the next adventure.
The town is in the middle of a certain amount of terrain, usually what the players could travel in a day or two.

This limits the scope of what the DM has to prepare in advance

yet allows the players to decide what they will do.
This is the opposite of a railroad, .

Where the DM does not give the players a choice in what they do and where they go

This tends to be GM’s that have designed an elaborate scenario and want all their cool work to be seen and appreciated by the players.
The DM of a sandbox style of play will have dungeons and treasures that the players may never find.
This is not a bad thing as the DM will have a larger stock of material for the future, or if multiple groups of players are running around the same general area.
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Tanya DePass is the founder and Director of I Need Diverse Games

a non-profit organization based in Chicago, which is dedicated to better diversification of all aspects of gaming.
I Need Diverse Games serves the community by supporting marginalized developers attend the Game Developer Conference by participating in the GDC Scholarship program, helps assist attendance at other industry events, and is seeking partnership with organizations and initiatives.

Tanya is a lifelong Chicagoan who loves everything about gaming

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She founded and was the EIC of Fresh Out of Tokens podcast where games culture was discussed and viewed through a lense of feminism, intersectionality and diversity.
Now she’s a co-host on Spawn on Me Podcast.
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She’s the Programming Coordinator for OrcaCon

she often speaks on issues of diversity, feminism, race, intersectionality & other topics at multiple conventions throughout the year.
Her writing about games and games critique appears in Uncanny Magazine, Polygon, Wiscon Chronicles, Vice Gaming, Paste Games, Mic, and other publications.

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